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How To Understand Food Labels While Grocery Shopping

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When you are grocery shopping for your family, do you ever get confused with what’s on the labels? Are there terms that make you second-guess what you are purchasing? If so, you are not alone.

In an article appearing on the U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance website FoodDialogues.com, farm mom Chris Chinn shares “There are so many food terms out there that it can make a trip to the grocery store seem exhausting at times.” Chinn is fortunate to have an insider’s view on how foods are raised and grown that helps guide her decisions when purchasing healthy foods to feed her family.

Here are some highlights from Chinn’s article:

“There are so many food terms out there that it can make a trip to the grocery store seem exhausting at times. I know many moms struggle with the term organic and whether organic food is healthier.  Organic is just a term to describe the method of how the food was produced, it doesn’t mean it’s a healthier option.  Organic farmers have to follow a guideline set forth by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) when it comes to choosing crop protection products to deter insects and weeds.  Here is a helpful article that explains the nutritional value of organic food is no different than food that isn’t organic.

Another label that confuses many of us is the term antibiotic-free.  All meat that is purchased at a grocery store, farmers market or a butcher shop is free of antibiotics.  The USDA has very strict guidelines when it comes to using antibiotics on farms.  The meat is tested by the USDA to ensure these guidelines are followed properly; this is an added layer of protection for consumers.  If an animal has been given antibiotics, a farmer cannot let the animal go to market until the proper withdrawal time has elapsed.  As a farmer and mom, I want my kids to have safe and healthy food. I feed my kids the same pork and beef that I RAISE for my friends, neighbors and consumers.”

To learn more about how Chinn feeds her family visit the full article by clicking here.

 

 

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